Bogota, Colombia

Bogota-Colombia

 Bogota, Colombia

In the last 5 decades this city has more than doubled its population 20 times. Considered to be the melting pot with people from across the country. The landscape is different from many others the Andes Mountain Range to the east are dark green. Bogota offers high-rise apartments and modern shopping malls. One place travelers must see is the Gold Museum which houses a rare collection of pre-hispanic objects.

Villa de Leyva, Colombia

COL Villa de Leyva Plaza2 (1)

Villa de Leyva, Colombia

One of the most beautiful colonial villages in Colombia, Villa de Leyva is a city frozen in time. Declared a national monument in 1954, the photogenic village has been preserved in its entirety with cobblestone roads and whitewashed buildings. The city’s physical beauty and mild, dry climate have long attracted outsiders. The town was founded in 1572 by Hernán Suárez de Villalobos, who named it for his boss, Andrés Díaz Venero de Leyva, the first president of the New Kingdom of Granada. It was originally a retreat for military officers, clergy and nobility. In recent years an influx of wealthy visitors and expats has slowly transformed this once-hidden gem. Boutique hotels, gourmet restaurants and tacky tourist shops are replacing many of the old family hosterías and cafes.

National Coffee Park Colombia


Tayrona National Park, Santa Marta, Colombia

tayrona

Tayrona National Park, Santa Marta  Colombia

This national park, containing tropical rainforest, snow-capped mountains and hugged by the Caribbean Sea is the most picturesque area in Colombia, in my humble opinion. Full of beautiful beaches, mostly isolated, and free from any major development apart from eco-friendly huts, Tayrona is a place for relaxing, unwinding and getting away from the everyday hustle of life.
Grab a tent, walk two hours into the jungle until you reach the pristine white sand beaches, hang up your hammock and relax for a few days in Caribbean bliss.

Providencia, Colombia

colombia-011 providencia

Providencia, Colombia

Traditionally known as Old Providence, the island covers an area of 17 sq km. It is the second-largest island of the archipelago. A mountainous island of volcanic origin, it is much older than San Andrés and is home to the second-largest barrier reef in the Americas. Santa Isabel, a village at the island’s northern tip, is the local administrative headquarters. Santa Catalina, a small island facing Santa Isabel, is separated from Providencia by the shallow Canal Aury, spanned by a pedestrian bridge. without a direct connection to the Colombian mainland, the island hasn’t seen nearly the same levels of cultural invasion, leaving the original traditions and customs more or less intact. All this combined with gorgeous topography standing sentinel over swaths of turquoise-blue sea gives Providencia no small claim to being paradise.